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Dr. Aries Arditi and former Lighthouse computer scientist Steven Azueta developed a computer graphic program for modeling geometric relationships among visual imagery, retinotopic maps describing visual capabilities and visual space. The program, which is called VP for Volume Perimetry, is an interactive tool which is used to elucidate the geometric aspects of visual perception of a hypothetical observer.

VP uses two types of windows on the computer screen. A WORLD window is used to represent the three-dimensional environment and visual space of the hypothetical observer, while a RETINA window illustrates retinal imagery and retinal function. These windows are yoked so that a change in the geometry of the observer's environment can be illustrated on the observer's retina. This yoking also allows the user to see the three-dimensional manifestations (in visual space) of two-dimensional retinal function.

VP incorporates a modeling system which allows the user to construct the observer's environment in a WORLD window. The hypothetical subject can be placed in an office environment which includes a desk, chair and lamp, for example. With use of the computer's mouse, the observer's gaze can then be interactively adjusted to look around the environment. As the observer's fixation is changing, the changing retinal imagery is displayed in the RETINA window.

The user can map areas of specific retinal function in the RETINA window. The areas can represent either dysfunction or acuity, depending on the user's task. These two-dimensional retinal characteristics can be retrojected into visual space; that is, their three-dimensional manifestations can be constructed in the hypothetical observer's environment. VP can also construct the three-dimensional intersections of the two-dimensional retinal characteristics. These reconstructions provide a valuable means for visualizing the impact of field defects on binocular performance of visual tasks. Development of this program was supported by a grant from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

Further Readings

Arditi, A. (1988). The volume visual field: A basis for functional perimetry. Clinical Vision Sciences, 3, 173-183.

Arditi, A., & Azueta, S. (1991). A computer graphic tool for geometric analysis of binocular space. Supplement to Optometry and Vision Science, 68(12S), 155.

Arditi, A., & Azueta, S. (1992). Visualization of 2-D and 3-D aspects of human binocular vision. Society for Information Display International Symposium Digest of Technical Papers, XXIII, 643-646.

Arditi, A., & Azueta, S. (1992). A computer graphic tool for the study of binocular space. Supplement to Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science, 33(4), 1375.

Arditi, A., Azueta, S., Larimer, T., Prevost, M., Lubin, J., & Bergen, J. (1992). Visualization and modeling of factors influencing visibility in computer-aided crewstation design. Society of Automotive Engineers Technical Paper Series, No. 921135, 1-10.

Arditi, A., Azueta, S., Larimer, J., Prevost, M., Lubin, J., & Bergen. J. (1992). Visualization and modeling of factors influencing visibility in computer-aided crewstation design. 1992 Transactions of the SAE International.

Azueta, S. (1993). VP User's Manual. Arlene R. Gordon Research Institute Technical Report VR03. New York: The Lighthouse Inc.

Larimer, J., Prevost, M., Arditi, A., & Bergen, J. (1990). A computer aided design tool for assessing the visibility of cockpit displays. In Proceedings of the Society for Information Display, 1-3.

Larimer, J., Prevost, M., Arditi, A., Azueta, S., Bergen, J., & Lubin, J. (1991). Human visual performance model for crewstation design. Proceedings of the SPIE/SPSE Symposium on Human Factors in Visual Perception, 1456, 196-210.

 

 

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