This program provides a solid framework for understanding the field of vision rehabilitation and illustrates practical techniques for working with people who have partial sight or who are blind. The program is divided into four comprehensive courses each of which has two lessons. The courses may be taken individually or in any combination. A 15 percent discount is given on registration fees when the program is taken in its entirety.

Mult-E-I -- Introduction to Vision Rehabilitation

This course explains important concepts and elements in the field of vision rehabilitation and defines key terms related to vision and vision loss. Information is provided about the most common causes of low vision in adults. Rehabilitation strategies are introduced, many of which are explored further in other lessons. For people new to vision rehabilitation and anyone who needs a broad-based review – this is the place to start!

Mult-E-II -- Daily Living Skills

This course introduces key concepts that can be applied to a variety of daily living activities, such as strategies for assisting clients to make phone calls, measure and pour liquids, organize belongings, and create a safe indoor environment.

Mult-E-III -- Low Vision Optical Devices

This course gives information on spectacles, hand and stand magnifiers, and the use of CCTVs. Optical concepts are illustrated and specific techniques are provided for assisting clients to use optical devices as efficiently as possible. Information on using telescopes for distance tasks is also included.

Mult-E-IV -- Orientation and Mobility Techniques

This course introduces various travel options for people with vision loss. Specific techniques are provided related to teaching and acting as a human guide for a person with partial sight or blindness. A number of techniques for independent indoor travel and familiarization to a new environment are also introduced, along with information on how you can help your clients develop skills in this area.

See below for detailed information about each lesson, including specifics regarding continuing education credits and registration.

Mult-E-I: Introduction to Vision Rehabilitation

Includes the following two lessons:

Lesson IA: Introduction to Vision and Low Vision

Summary: This lesson defines key vision rehabilitation terms and reviews the anatomy of the eye and its refractive elements. The terms low vision, legal blindness, visual acuity, visual field, contrast sensitivity, and refractive error are explained. The lesson provides a foundation for understanding how and why certain visual conditions can be corrected with glasses or contact lenses, while other conditions cannot, and thus lead to low vision.

Learning Objectives: When you complete this lesson, you will be able to:

  • Define and compare the terms “low vision” and “legal blindness.”
  • Describe the goal of low vision care.
  • Explain how visual acuity, visual field and contrast sensitivity contribute to sight.
  • Define the following conditions and discuss how each can be corrected with optical lenses: hyperopia, myopia and presbyopia.

Lesson IB: Vision Loss and its Impact on Function

Summary: Even with the same eye disease, the extent of vision loss can vary from person to person. Information is provided about some of the most common causes of vision loss in adults and how they affect the way a person functions in daily life. Activities in this lesson illustrate how people with different types of vision loss might see. Rehabilitation strategies, many of which are explored further in other lessons, are introduced here.

Learning Objectives: When you complete this lesson, you will be able to:

  • Describe the effects on visual function related to each of the three categories of vision loss: central vision loss; peripheral vision loss; overall blur.
  • Name the key area(s) of the visual system that relates to each category of vision loss.
  • Describe environmental and adaptive modifications that can improve functional vision related to the three categories of vision loss.

Target Audience: Vision rehabilitation professionals, ophthalmic technicians, occupational therapists, nurses, TVIs, opticians

CE Credits: 3.0 CE hours ACVREP; AOTA .30 CEUs

The assignment of AOTA CEUs does not imply endorsement of specific course content, products, or clinical procedures by AOTA.

AOTA Content Focus:

  • Occupational Process: Evaluation
  • Occupational Process: Intervention

AOTA Content Level:

  • Beginner/Intermediate

There is a quiz at the end of each lesson. To receive continuing education credit, you will need to earn a grade of 70% or better on each quiz. You will also need to complete a brief evaluation of each lesson.

Availability: On demand for 60 days from registration.

Faculty: Debra Entin, MS, RN, CPNP; Eleanor E. Faye, MD; Michael Fischer, OD; Cydney Strand, RN

Tuition: $120.00 (15% discount if you take the entire four-course Mult-E-Skills program)

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Mult-E-II: Daily Living Skills

Includes the following two lessons:

Lesson IIA: Daily Living Skills – Part One: Alternate Media and Measurement

Summary: This lesson provides practical information on how to help people with vision loss perform everyday activities such as making a phone call, pouring liquids and measuring various items. The lesson includes key concepts that you can apply to other activities in a variety of settings to help your clients with vision loss adjust to doing daily activities non-visually or less-visually, but still safely and independently.

Learning Objectives: When you complete this lesson, you will be able to:

  • List five categories of daily living skills and describe at least one skill or technique in each category.
  • Explain how and why the following two concepts are important assessment clues when helping a client learn a task: 1) new or known task; 2) importance of task to the client.
  • List three types of Alternate Media and three types of Measurement.
  • Demonstrate how to perform and teach an example of an alternate media task and a measurement task.

Lesson IIB: Daily Living Skills – Part Two: Organization, Scanning and Safety
Summary: This lesson focuses on the concepts of organization, scanning and safety. Organization techniques include labeling and marking, identifying clothing and differentiating between different values of paper money or coins, all of which enhance independence. Scanning techniques that can be of use in a variety of daily living situations are introduced. Suggestions on how to improve safety in the home environment, as well as specific techniques related to heat, electricity and sharp objects, will be discussed.

Learning Objectives: When you complete this lesson, you will be able to:

  • Discuss how to initiate an effective organization system for a person with a visual impairment.
  • Name five items that often need marking or labeling and give an example of how to mark or label each one.
  • Explain how the technique of scanning a surface can be used for locating items, household maintenance and for personal hygiene.
  • List five potentially dangerous conditions in a home environment and discuss how each can be made safer for a person with a visual impairment.

Target Audience: Vision rehabilitation professionals, ophthalmic technicians, occupational therapists, nurses, TVI’s, opticians

CE Credits: 2.5 CE hours ACVREP; AOTA .25 CEUs

The assignment of AOTA CEUs does not imply endorsement of specific course content, products, or clinical procedures by AOTA.

  • AOTA Content Focus - Domain of OT: Areas of Occupation
  • AOTA Content Level – Beginner/Intermediate

There is a quiz at the end of each lesson. To receive continuing education credit you will need to earn a grade of 70 percent or better on each quiz. You will also need to complete a brief evaluation of each lesson.

Availability: On demand for 60 days from registration

Faculty: Debra Entin, MS, RN, CPNP; Mara Mervius, OTR/L; Nancy Paskin, CVRT

Tuition: $100.00 (15% discount if you take the entire four-course Mult-E-Skills program)

Register Now

Contact CE

Mult-E-III: Low Vision Optical Devices

Includes the following two lessons:

Lesson IIIA: Optical Devices for Near Tasks

Summary: The lesson explains the basic optical properties of low vision spectacles, hand magnifiers and stand magnifiers and how these devices are used by people with low vision to accomplish tasks done at near distances. Ways in which you can reinforce correct and efficient use of these devices by your clients is also provided.

Learning Objectives: When you complete this lesson, you will be able to:

  • Identify the defining characteristics of each of the following type of optical device: spectacles, loupes, hand magnifiers, and stand magnifiers.
  • Define the terms “focal distance” and “working distance” and discuss the role of each when teaching a client to use a low vision optical device.
  • Compare and contrast the key advantages and disadvantages of each type of near device (spectacle, loupe, hand magnifier, stand magnifier, CCTV).

Lesson IIIB: Telescopes

Lesson Summary: This lesson explains how to identify various types of telescopes and the optimal way your clients should hold, focus and view through a telescope. Learn when and how telescopes are used thereby increasing your ability to appropriately refer clients for low vision services.

Learning Objectives: When you complete this lesson, you will be able to:

  • Compare and contrast the features of Galilean and Keplerian telescopes.
  • Explain the significance of the markings on a telescope.
  • Discuss the key points to cover when assisting a client to use a telescope.

Target Audience: Vision rehabilitation professionals, ophthalmic technicians, occupational therapists, nurses, TVIs, opticians

CE Credits: 2.5 CE hours ACVREP; AOTA .25 CEUs

The assignment of AOTA CEUs does not imply endorsement of specific course content, products, or clinical procedures by AOTA.

  • AOTA Content Focus – Domain of OT: Activity Demands
  • AOTA Content Level: Beginner/Intermediate

There is a quiz at the end of each lesson. To receive continuing education credit you will need to earn a grade of 70% or better on each quiz. You will also need to complete a brief evaluation of each lesson.

Availability: On demand for 60 days from registration

Faculty: Eleanor E. Faye, MD; Michael Fischer, OD; Bruce Rosenthal, OD; Cydney Strand, RN

Tuition: $100.00 (15% discount if you take the entire four-course Mult-E-Skills program)

Register Now

Contact CE

Mult-E-IV: Orientation and Mobility Techniques

Includes the following two lessons:

Lesson IVA: Human Guide Technique

Summary: This lesson presents detailed information on the Human Guide and Self-Protective Techniques. The lesson prepares you to perform these techniques, as well as teach them to a person who is going to be a guide or be guided. Information is also included about the long cane, support canes and service animals.

Learning Objectives: When you complete this lesson, you will be able to:

  • Demonstrate and explain the correct position for human guide technique in normal walking situations, as well as in special situations (narrow passageways and on stairs).
  • Demonstrate and discuss the purpose of upper self-protective technique and lower self-protective technique.
  • Discuss how to teach clients to use proper technique with anyone who guides them.

Lesson IVB: Independent Indoor Travel Techniques

Summary: This course introduces the techniques used by people with vision impairment to travel safely and independently in indoor environments and how you can help your clients develop these important skills. You will also learn how to assist a person to become familiar with a new environment and how to correct some of the most common mistakes related to traveling independently indoors.

Learning Objectives: When you complete this lesson, you will be able to:

  • Describe three monitoring positions for teaching orientation and mobility skills.
  • Define and demonstrate the following techniques: trailing, indoor direction taking, familiarization.
  • Compare and contrast two direction-taking techniques: aligning and squaring off.
  • Define the following terms as used in orientation and mobility: landmark, shoreline, direction indicator, side-stepping, veering and home base.

Target Audience: Vision rehabilitation professionals, ophthalmic technicians, occupational therapists, nurses, TVIs, opticians

CE Credits: 2.0 CE hours ACVREP; AOTA .20 CEUs

The assignment of AOTA CEUs does not imply endorsement of specific course content, products, or clinical procedures by AOTA.

  • AOTA Content Focus – Domain of OT: Performance Skills
  • AOTA Content Level – Beginner/Intermediate

There is a quiz at the end of each lesson. To receive continuing education credit you will need to earn a grade of 70% or better on each quiz. You will also need to complete a brief evaluation of each lesson.

Availability: On demand for 60 days from registration

Faculty: Karen Kramer, COMS; Cydney Strand, RN

Tuition: $80.00 (15% discount if you take the entire four-course Mult-E-Skills program)

Register Now

Contact CE

 

 

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